Posts Tagged ‘frame’

Video Tour of the Virgin Mary Statue on top of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center

Here is a video tour of the scaffolding and the Mother Mary statue on top of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, NJ. It clearly shows the damage that the earthquake did to her as well as the necessary guy-wires to hold her down in case of aftershocks. Superior Scaffold had to transport all of the scaffolding materials through a maze in the hospital and even assemble most of the sections on a lower roof and then hoist them up where they could be put into place. You can see the difficulties in just getting to the statue in another video I posted called access.


Insert into Catholic Star Herald – Save Our Lady of Lourdes

Superior Scaffold’s photos were used in the press releases and this insert into the Catholic Star Herald.

See additional photos here.

If you would like to help with the preservation of this beloved landmark…

Click on the image above to read more about this worthwhile cause.

Or click on the following link:

Save Our Lady of Lourdes insert into Catholic Star Herald


Superior Scaffold introduces the new 4 wire electric system for suspended scaffolds

Our expert tells us about how this new 4 wire electric system replaces the traditional heavy 110 transformers on suspended scaffolds.

This is the first in a series of videos that will give tips and advice for the suspended scaffold / scaffolding users.


Guy-Wire all over the statue of Mother Mary

Saving Our Lady of Lourdes

TIMELINE OF HOW A SCAFFOLD COMPANY SAVED AN ICON – in less than 24 hours!

At 1:51 pm on Wednesday 8/23/11 an earthquake of 5.8 magnitude rocked the east coast.  It was followed by two smaller aftershocks of 2.8 & 2.2.  On the whole, structural damage was fairly limited – given the wide scope of the quake.

Immediately, inspectors were sent out to every scaffold job site to make sure nothing had shifted, moved, or changed with the scaffolding around any of the structures.  As the world found out – there were a few national structures that were damaged, such as the Washington Monument and the National Cathedral.  But up in Camden, NJ a national treasure was teetering on the brink of disaster.

Medium Shot of the statue on top of the building with scaffolding

The statue on top of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical center had shifted and broken.  The big fear was that an aftershock would topple the statue of Mother Mary – not only breaking the iconic figure but endangering patrons at the medical center.  The call went out to Superior Scaffold’s emergency services unit.

Our Lady of Lourdes Shift and CracksChips from the statue

Timeline for a rescue:

7:30am – Superior received the call the morning after the quake.

8:30 am – Superior was on site assessing the damage up on the roof.  A material list was sent out, as well as calls to team members who assist in erecting the scaffolding on top of the roof.  A truck was loaded at the yard and sent to Camden.

11:00 am – The equipment truck as well as 6 team members arrives.  A plan was in place to get the scaffolding to the roof – not an easy task (which I will detail in another blog about access).  Crews would have to use freight elevators to the highest point and then all of the necessary equipment would have to be taken up several staircases that wind up through the hospital to the second roof.

Access to the roofAccess for crews to get to the statueRoof Access to Lady of Lourdes statue

Once to the lower roof, a stockpile scaffolding to be used up on the next level was made.  Portions of the scaffolding were actually assembled in the very small second roof and then handed up to the top section.  Crew members had to climb through several more narrow areas of the hospital just to reach the statue on the roof.  Once there, a rope and wheel hoist were used to get the scaffolding up to the statue where it could be put into place.

The superior team worked until the wee hours erecting the scaffolding and securing the iconic statue to make sure no further damage could be done should there be more aftershocks.   Guy-wires were strapped all around the statue and tied down to make sure she couldn’t and wouldn’t topple over.

Guy-Wire all over the statue of Mother Mary

3:00 am – Less than 24 hours after receiving the emergency call Superior’s team finished the job.

Our Lady of Lourdes ScaffoldingOur Lady of Lourdes in place

In the oncoming months, restoration crews will come in and repair the damage that was done.

Even though the images of the guy-wires strapping her down are intense – the statue of the Mother Mary on top of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical center is safe and secure.

Top of Our Lady of Lourdes Medical BuildingOur Lady of Lourdes statue on top of the Medical Center in Camden, NJ

Mother Mary looking over the city of Philadelphia

Hospital administrators could now rest safely, knowing that one call to Superior scaffold saved an icon. (Our Lady of Lourdes)


New article in ALH magazine features Superior Scaffold

Access, Lift & Handlers magazine’s September – October 2011 issue features a wonderful article by Lindsey Anderson.  In her Scaffold Market report she takes a look at how the recession has affected the overall scaffold and scaffolding industry and how companies are adapting to be successful.

She features several heavy hitters in the industry including Superior Scaffold, Philadelphia, PA.   The article also features several job photographs taken by Erik Highland.   Photographs include the renovation at Temple University’s Baptist Temple Church into the new performing arts center, the new Capital Health Hospital in Hopewell, NJ, and the renovation of Independence Hall tower in downtown Philadelphia.

You can read the article titled, Shifting Markets here.

 

Scaffold Industry Report

There are also several great quotes from CEO, Guy Bianchini on the long term outlook for Superior and others in the scaffolding industry.  Thanks to Lindsey for featuring Superior in ALH – and kudos for a great job on the Magazine Article.


Independence Hall Update – 10.4.11

Well, things are surely coming along at the Independence Hall Tower.  Crews have really done a terrific job getting the spire repainted, the ball and weather vane re-guilded, the roof flashing in place.  It’s looks great.  They have even taken most of the decorative urns down to have them repainted as well.   I saw it with my own eyes.  It’s been a good 6 months since I was last up on the scaffold.  I do have photos and will post them up tomorrow.   We got to see inside the bell housing as well.  They have put new metal flashing down in there as well and completely repainted the surrounding bell housing.  This new refurb should last another 100 years.  It’s pretty cool to see how the tower is taking shape as they move down further towards the ground and take down the decorative scrim.  We did notice that they are getting the gold colors in the clock faces as well.  Just a quick entry here but I will post more details when I get the photos up.


How we got Press for our Company – Part 3 (Success)

Everyone will tell you, that in business you need a bit of luck once in a while – and this was no different.  We had everything together and ready to go but who would we get it to?

And as bit of luck would have it, while going through our contacts, we remembered an email we had gotten from Vince Brennan, the editor at Scaffold Industry Magazine a few months prior, asking what we had going on.  Bam.  We gave Erik Highland, our photographer and marketing guy,  Vince’s name and number and said – “have it him.”,  which he obviously did, because a week later we were answering a list of questions he had prepared for us about our roll in the Independence Hall renovation.  Erik sent him some of the photographs (with and without the scrim) and Vince thought they might even be good enough to garner the cover shot!  How cool would that be?    We were all very excited about this opportunity.

For several weeks we went back and forth with the photographs and text that Vince had written for the article.  It was a terrific story and the photographs really helped accentuate the work we had done.

We crossed our fingers that our scaffold and scrim project would make it onto the cover of one of the biggest magazines in our industry.  But as fate would have it – we lost out to a man wearing a safety harness.  The issue was all about safety so they went with a logical choice.  But Vince did an awesome job with the article!  Superior Scaffold from Philadelphia got a 4 page spread on the inside of the magazine.

 

It worked.  Our small idea about documenting the job we did and then finding an angle for the story paid off.

And that wasn’t the end.  There was more to come!

See part 4.


Getting Press for our Company Part 2 (writing a press release and searching contacts)

Okay – we’ve made our plan.  We’ve picked the project that would be great for all of America to talk about (the renovation of Independence Hall) and we’ve gotten some fantastic photos of both phases of the job site.

Now what?

How do we get press for the scaffold work we’ve done?   We started by compiling a list of contacts that we have had over the years.  Some are still valid and some are not – but we look at them as possible leads to run a story on us.  While we are culling through our possible contacts we write a press release detailing our role in the renovation process.  Since we were not the general contractor (GC) but the scaffold company, we have a slightly different role in the process (mainly designing, renting, transporting and erecting the scaffolding).

So we come up with our angle on the story.  Every press release needs an angle.  Since the major papers in the area have all done a generic story on the renovation of the beloved landmark we need something new, something fresh that will still tie into the overall renovation project.

We find it in the decorative scrim that was added to our scaffolding.  That’s a cool story because, not only does the scrim add a great look to building while renovations are taking place but the structural engineering changes that had to be made to accommodate it were pretty significant.  So we detailed the equipment, the procedures and even include a few quotes from the engineers and the CEO of the company – and boom.  We are ready to get it out to the public.

For the correct format of writing a press release and/or what to include you can google or hit any of the search engines “How to write a good press release” and you’ll get plenty of guidance.

We knew that we wanted to be placed in some of the industry magazines so that’s where we focused.

A home run.  See part 3.


Exterior renovation begins at the Golden Nugget Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City

The former Trump Marina hotel and casino, in Atlantic City has been purchased by Landry’s Inc., an international gaming and restaurant operator and is being rebranded with the Golden Nugget name.

Superior Scaffold has been brought in as part of the $100 Million renovation to help restore the facade with an EIFS (Exterior Insulated Finishing System), restoration of the 90′ high Crystal and 220′ high Bay Towers of the Golden Nugget.

Superior’s rental department will be installing 18 swing stages and 4 mast climbing platforms!  They will also install 170′ of overhead protection for the Atrium glass on the pool deck and stair towers for access to the sixth floor roof.

We will post pictures soon – as it should be quite a site.

Here is an artist rendering of what the finished renovations will look like.


Getting Press for our company Part 1

PR seems like an easy thing to do.  Right?  Well, not so much.  We are experts in scaffolding not getting press.  But we did realize that is a vital part of our marketing mix.  The more we can tell and show people about the work we do the better they will understand our business and in turn hire us.  But how do you go about doing it?

The key for us was the word ‘show.”  We can have our engineers describe the architectural details all day long but what better way to showcase our  work than to photograph it.  That way, clients, customers and even general contractors can see just how good we are – especially on the historic projects where the utmost care is needed.

We decided that the Independence Hall project would be the perfect opportunity to do just that.  The first step was finding a photographer crazy enough to climb around the scaffolding we build.  We found him in Erik Highland.  Not only was his willing to go where most people never dared but seeing his work we realized that he could tell our story visually.

www.erikhighland.com

He took some awesome shots of the scaffolding in place and then some of the decorative scrim being installed.

 

Independence Hall Scrim

You can see more of those images by clicking here.

The shots told our story perfectly.  But now what would we do with them?

That was the million-dollar question.  I’ll detail that in part 2.